Retail Associate

Corporate Department: Casa Verde Vending & Management Co.
(BAK Festivals, Inc./Casa Verde Vending & Management Co.)

Department: East of Eden Cannabis Co.

Reports To: President, East of Eden Cannabis Co.

FLSA Status (Non-Exempt Hourly/Exempt Salary): Non-Exempt Hourly

Job Mission:

The Retail Associate position will serve as an integral member of the daily operations team at
retail dispensary locations operated by East of Eden Cannabis Co.

Essential Functions:
● Serve as a point-of-contact for all customers at East of Eden Cannabis Co.
● Manage dispensary inventory
● Assure that daily operations at East of Eden Cannabis Co. retail outlets run smoothly and
efficiently
● Other duties as required

Required Education, Skills and Experience:
● Education:
○ High school or equivalent in experience
● Skills
○ Customer service skills
○ Ability to use software utilized at East of Eden Cannabis Co. retail outlets
○ Knowledge of or interest in cannabis
● Physical Demands:
○ The employee is frequently required to use hands to type, handle, feel
○ The employee is regularly required to walk, sit, talk and hear
○ The employee is regularly required to stand, stoop, kneel, crouch or reach
○ The employee must have the ability to occasionally safely lift and/or move a minimum of 30 lbs.

Colombia Turns A New Leaf

Colombia has rightly attracted the attention of international cannabis investors, but the country faces unique political and social challenges

Guest Feature: Mat Youkee is a consultant and journalist covering Latin America from his base in Bogotá, Colombia. Since May 2018 he has published The Colombia Cannabis Investor, a free monthly business intelligence publication focused on the Colombian medical marijuana industry. He tweets at @colcannin

Birds of Passage, Colombia’s nomination for this year’s Oscars, tells the story of tribal conflict for control of marijuana drug routes in the country’s northern regions in the 1970s. The story is a timely and tragic reminder that, before Colombia became synonymous with cocaine, it was a hub for high-quality grass for American counterculture.

Today Colombia is in a different place. Over a decade of strong economic growth was capped, in 2016, with a peace treaty with the FARC, the largest guerrilla army. But the fertile soils and ample sunlight still make a great place for growers. Today, a rapidly developing regulatory framework is allowing local and foreign firms to build a legal medical marijuana industry.

In the last five months, Canadian majors including Canopy Growth Corp, Aphria and Aurora have acquired projects in the South American nation. Local companies PharmaCielo and Khiron Life Sciences also have advanced-stage cultivation and production projects, the latter becoming the first Colombian cannabis firm to list on the Toronto Venture Exchange. The big players have pledged more than $200m in foreign investment for the coming year and a host of enterprising domestic entrepreneurs are acquiring plots and applying for licenses, with nearly 200 awarded or under process.

There are strong grounds for this optimism. In January 2018 the International Narcotics Control Board, the UN body that regulates the global cultivation of medicinal narcotics, allotted Colombia 40.5 tonnes of marijuana production. This was the largest allocation of any country, representing 44% of the global total, and outstripping the US and Israel.

Aside from its climatic advantages, Colombia has a strong tradition of cultivation of flowers, cheap labor costs and a regulatory regime that allows for the export of medicinal marijuana products. Commercialization of the cannabis flower is not permitted, ensuring that all legally grown plants must be converted into an oil, cream or other medicinal product. The Colombian healthcare sector – indebted to the tune of $4bn – is desperately looking to cut its expenses, and research from Khiron suggests that over 5 million locals could benefit from medicinal marijuana products, helping to cut imports of opiates.

Colombia is no stranger to Canadian capital markets. Especially since the early 2000s, Canadian geologists have been scouring the previously out-of-bounds regions for oil and mineral deposits and Bay Street investors have seen a number of Colombian success stories. Many firms’ successes were based on their ability to successfully manage political and security risks that had been overestimated by mainstream investors. Now that Colombia is in vogue, the concern is that investors underestimate residual risk.

Those risks can be broadly categorized into three groups, with the first being regulatory confusion. Although the previous government made a clear move in 2016 to build a medicinal marijuana market, with Congress approving the law by a huge majority, many of the downstream regulatory changes have yet to be solidified. Marijuana is yet to be classified as a medicinal plant by the food and drug standards agency. The system to award production quotas remains opaque and local banks have steered well clear of opening bank accounts for cannabis companies, let alone providing loans.

The more dynamic local firms, such as Khiron and PharmaCielo have invested significantly in navigating the regulatory maze and educating government and medical personnel on cannabis issues. However, newly elected conservative president Ivan Duque chose a crackdown on micro-trafficking of marijuana as his first social policy. While no one expects him to reverse legalized medicinal use, it raises questions as to the political will to put in place the necessary reforms to boost the industry.

The second area of risk is local growing conditions. While Colombia has dozens of local cannabis strains, many firms have opted to bring foreign seeds to the market. But certain areas around Bogotá and Medellín, the two largest cities, have been affected by an intensive flower industry. Some foreign strains have proved less resistant to local soils and pests.

Another significant issue is physical security and community relations in rural Colombia. In recent years populations near major mining and oil projects have used local referendums to put a halt to extractive projects. One local firm has faced stiff community opposition at its project in the department (state) of Santander due to the perceived effect its project will have on local water sources.  Finally, the murder of three geologists working for a Canadian mining firm in September is a reminder that, despite the peace deal, rural Colombia has serious security threats in certain localized areas.

Colombia has rightly gained a reputation as one of the most exciting cannabis markets in Latin America and the industry has the potential to become a major plank of the national economy. But investors should be under no illusion of the challenges companies face. As well as strong technical teams and a vigilant security protocol, firms will need to keep a close eye on the morphing regulatory and political framework. Colombia Cannabis Investor, a free monthly newsletter, aims to report the most timely business intelligence on the sector, straight from Bogotá and Medellín.

September State Legislative Look

On August 31st, the Legislature adjourned for the 2017-18 legislative session.  Of the hot end-of-session bills, like wildfire liability and net neutrality, some cannabis bills were still being debated on the Floor. Of the many cannabis-related bills, three have already been signed and one vetoed by the Governor.  Twenty-three never made it fully through the legislative process, and these are the 13 bills pending Governor action before the September 30th deadline:

AB 1793 (Bonta) – This bill expedites the identification, review, and notification of individuals who may be eligible for recall or dismissal, dismissal and sealing, or redesignation of specified cannabis-related convictions.

AB 1863 (Jones-Sawyer) – This bill allows taxpayers subject to Personal Income Tax Law to deduct ordinary and necessary business expenses attributable to commercial cannabis activity by a licensee.

AB 2020 (Quirk) – This bill would authorize the Bureau of Cannabis Control to issue a temporary state license to provide on-site sales and consumption of cannabis at a temporary event located at a fairground, district agricultural association event, or at another venue expressly approved by a local jurisdiction.

AB 2255 (Lackey) – Would allow law enforcement to seize and potentially destroy cannabis, in consultation with the Bureau of Cannabis Control (BCC), if a licensed distributor is found to be transporting cannabis or cannabis product that is significantly in excess of the amount stated on the shipping manifest.  Clarifies that transportation of cannabis or cannabis product with a counterfeit shipping manifest is unlawful.

AB 2799 (Jones-Sawyer) – Requires an applicant for a state license under the Medicinal and Adult Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) to provide a statement that the applicant employs, or will employ within one year of receiving a license, an employee who has successfully completed a training course offered by a training provider authorized by an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Training Institute Education Center.  Exempts applicants with only one employee.

AB 2899 (Rubio) – Prohibits a cannabis licensee from publishing or disseminating advertising or marketing while the licensee’s license is suspended.

AB 2914 (Cooley) – Prohibits an alcoholic beverage licensee from selling, offering, or providing cannabis or cannabis products, including the sale of an alcoholic beverage that contains cannabis, and clarifies existing law banning alcoholic beverages containing tetrahydrocannabinol or cannabinoids, regardless of source.

AB 2980 (Gipson) – Redefines “premises” for purposes of licensed cannabis businesses to allow for the sharing of common use areas, such as bathrooms, break rooms, locker rooms, hallways, or loading docks wherein no license privileges are exercised.

SB 311 (Pan) – This bill authorizes a distributor to transport cannabis and cannabis products to another distributor.

SB 829 (Wiener) – This bill allows specified cannabis license holders to donate medicinal cannabis and medicinal cannabis products to qualified patients, and allows such donations to be exempt from the cultivation tax, the use tax, and the excise tax.

SB 1294 (Bradford) – This bill establishes the California Cannabis Equity Act of 2018, which will allow, upon appropriations by the Legislature, a local jurisdiction to submit an application to the Bureau of Cannabis Control (Bureau) for a grant to assist local equity applicants and local equity licensees through that local jurisdiction’s equity program; requires the Bureau to post model ordinances; and requires the Bureau to publish a report on local jurisdiction equity programs, as specified.

SB 1409 (Wilk) – This bill updates existing California law pertaining to the production and cultivation of industrial hemp.

SB 1459 (Cannella) – This bill establishes a provisional cannabis license that may be issued at the sole discretion of a licensing authority, as specified, until January 1, 2020.

 

Post-Processing Trimmer

JOB DESCRIPTION

Grupo Flor is looking to hire Post-Processing Trimmers responsible for all parts of the trimming process.  Specifically, this position will be responsible for:

  • Flower trimming
  • Product weighing
  • Product packaging
  • Product storage
  • Quality assurance
  • Other duties as assigned

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Able to follow trimming instructions and direction
  • Punctuality
  • Ability to work in teams
  • Focus and thoroughness
  • Authenticity – we care about the people with whom we work and the communities in which we live. We believe that clear communication builds a better world than suspicion, and that transparency is the key to building trust and confidence in all that we do.
  • Resourcefulness – we seek individuals that are adaptive and creative, finding joy in connecting assets and ideas in novel ways that are not immediately apparent to others.
  • Innovation – we seek individuals that are excited to not only work in a new industry, but to create one.

ABOUT GRUPO FLOR

Grupo Flor is an ecosystem of cannabis companies based in Salinas, California that supports the entire supply chain of cannabis production, from real estate leasing and equipment financing to sound product manufacturing and retail operations.  Grupo Flor seeks to elevate and legitimize the cannabis industry by pioneering a new business ecosystem of global companies and brands, and works to build leading cannabis companies that shape the future of the industry.  For more information, visit our website here.

Grupo Flor is committed to creating a diverse environment and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.  Furthermore, Grupo Flor is passionate about our local community and economy, and building an exciting future for both.  All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, genetics, disability, age, or veteran status.  Diverse applicants are encouraged to apply.

To apply, send resumes and all relevant information to hr@grupoflor.com

Smoke Stacks™ Leads the Way After Implementation of Harsh Regulations

California’s cannabis testing regulations became effective July 1, 2018, increasing the cannabis test thresholds to levels never before experienced in the California market. Most California producers believed the state would, yet again, extend the regulatory implementation period another six months. Grupo Flor however, took a contrary view. We organized our processes and lab partner relationships so that our in-house flower and concentrates brand, Smoke Stacks™,  would hit shelves July 1, 2018 being fully tested, labeled and packaged in full compliance with the law.

The July 1, 2018 implementation impact was massive and sudden. Whole swaths of California wholesale supply chain producers were unable to meet the new test standards and Facebook and Instagram posts went viral of empty dispensary shelves across the state. One winner emerged: Smoke Stacks™.

While certainly exciting in terms of validating and testing our products and business processes, the most thrilling aspects has been relationship development and the acquisition of market share. The cherry on top is the great response to the quality of our product from shops throughout the state.

While betting on July’s implementation and preparing to mobilize may not seem genius, consider that Grupo Flor’s distribution company had to source goods from a small and diverse archipelago of farms that were themselves producing compliant cannabis.

Quite a feat in the absence of a robust and standard supply chain.

Local Look

A New Beginning
Jennifer Rosenthal Iverson, Esq.

Jennifer is a local cannabis and criminal defense attorney and Vice President of MCCIA. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and does not reflect an official position of the Association.

July 1 marked the beginning of new and exciting times at both the State and local levels.  The most impactful regulations facing operators are the testing and packaging requirements.  These requirements have had a substantial effect on the market. Across the state dispensaries and retail facilities are experiencing the fallout of the supply chain.

The County of Monterey is gearing up on enforcement for all cannabis operators.  As indicated in the County’s recent memorandum released June 29th, in order to remain in good standing you must submit your conditional use permit application by August 1, 2018.  If you do not submit your conditional use permit application you will not be able to continue cultivating on site.  Further, the County is conducting both canopy audits and inspections for building code violations. Any building code violations found on site could have a substantial negative impact on the operator’s ability to continue cultivating and moving forward through the regulatory scheme.  If you are conducting structural improvements to buildings and greenhouses it is critical to go through the required permitting process.

In addition, the County and State will be issuing enforcement actions against all entities that are currently operating with over 25 employees and do not have a permitted public water system. If you are operating with more than 25 employees it is critical to start the process of the State Public Water System application.  The process alone can take up to 6 months and your conditional use permit application will not be deemed completed until you have submitted your application.

First Look at California’s Proposed Final Marijuana Regs

California regulators released the first draft of permanent adult-use and medical marijuana regulations on Friday, July 13, starting the clock on a process of hearings and public comment that will end later this year with a final set of rules governing the nascent industry.

The proposed rules are contained in 315 pages of documents issued by the Bureau of Cannabis Control, the Department of Food and Agriculture and the Department of Public Health.

The changes that were most apparent were:

  • Deliveries anywhere. The new language will allow licensed marijuana deliveries in any city or county in the state, even those that ban retail outlets, processing and cultivation. The provisions are similar to legislation, now shelved, that would have barred local governments from stopping state-regulated companies from delivering to their residents. That bill drew opposition from cities and counties, which argued that local control is a key tenet of Proposition 64, the 2016 voter initiative legalizing recreational marijuana. Companies including WeDrop Cannabis Delivery, CannaWagon and Weedmaps lobbied for the bill.
  • Advertising restrictions are increased New rules expand restrictions on marijuana advertising that might appeal to children, such as the use of inflatables, toys and cartoon characters. Additionally, outdoor advertising must be affixed to a building or a “permanent structure.” That would appear to bar roving billboards attached to trucks or truck trailers. As for billboards, “It would depend on the billboard,” said Bureau of Cannabis Control spokesman Alex Traverso. “We’d have to look it at case-by-case.” The bureau’s proposal also offers guidance for how advertisers can show that 71.6 percent of their audience is 21 years of age or older.
  • Attention events-holders. Changes will require cannabis event-holders to provide more details about where licensed retailers will be set up, where attendees can light up or consume marijuana and where sales will occur. Cannabis-focused events have proven challenging for organizers working under the state’s emergency regulations. Organizers of the Chalice Festival sued the Bureau of Cannabis Control and the city of Victorville in June after they declined to issue permits for the event planned for the San Bernardino County fairgrounds this month.

View the proposed text of regulations by clicking here.

Distributing the highest quality cannabis throughout California

Regulatory compliance and accountability is the “What” we do; but it’s really the “Why” we do and “How” we do distribution that sets FlorX apart. FlorX is the distribution arm of Grupo Flor and its run by cannabis retail veterans, supply chain logistics experts and straight-up process nerds who combined efforts create a killer distribution service with one singular goal: reduce back-end hassles so shop owners can focus on the front of shop.

“FlorX is paving the way with cannabis distribution by embracing forward looking supply chain strategies. The team at FlorX is obsessed with procuring quality product and delivering world class customer service.  The team at FlorX is also very focused on compliance to local and state regulations. This has allowed FlorX to be there for dispensaries when others were not prepared, said Steve Podell, President of Distribution.

OPEN JOB FAIR – July 28, 2018

Grupo Flor is looking to hire for a number of positions in cannabis dispensary retail operations, as well as cannabis manufacturing. Positions are varied and diverse–more information on specific positions to come. Interested parties are encouraged to attend the Job Fair at the location/time below:

DATE: Saturday, July 28, 2018
TIME: 9-4pm
LOCATION: 514 Work St. Salinas, California 93901

QUALIFICATIONS:
● Age 21+
● Professional appearance and demeanor
● Experience in and knowledge of the cannabis industry preferred
● Authenticity – we care about the people with whom we work and the communities in which we live. We believe that clear communication builds a better world than suspicion, and that transparency is the key to building trust and confidence in all that we do.
● Resourcefulness – we seek individuals that are adaptive and creative, finding joy in connecting assets and ideas in novel ways that are not immediately apparent to others.
● Innovation – we seek individuals that are excited to not only work in a new industry, but to create one.

COMPENSATION
● Competitive salary
● Health insurance
● Opportunity to work with an exciting, quickly-growing start-up in an emerging industry

PLEASE BRING 3 COPIES OF YOUR RESUME TO THE JOB FAIR

ABOUT GRUPO FLOR
Grupo Flor is an ecosystem of cannabis companies based in Salinas, California that supports the entire supply chain of cannabis production, from real estate leasing and equipment financing to sound product manufacturing and retail operations. Grupo Flor seeks to elevate and legitimize the cannabis industry by pioneering a new business ecosystem of global companies and brands, and works to build leading cannabis
companies that shape the future of the industry.

Grupo Flor is committed to creating a diverse environment and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. Furthermore, Grupo Flor is passionate about our local community and economy, and building an exciting future for both. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, genetics, disability, age, or veteran status. Diverse applicants are encouraged to apply.

Human Resources Coordinator

JOB DESCRIPTION

The Human Resources Coordinator will be responsible for building and managing Grupo Flor’s Human Resources department, including maintaining personnel-related data, administering payroll and benefits, spearheading recruitment strategies and programs, developing safety programs and procedures, creating employment training programs, overseeing general office administration, and more. The Human Resources Coordinator will play a key role in building and maintaining Grupo Flor’s culture and human resources capital, as well as ensuring an organized and efficient work environment.

This is an exciting opportunity to develop and build a new department in a quickly-
growing start-up of an emerging industry.

QUALIFICATIONS:

● Bachelor’s degree or the equivalent in experience. Masters or other advanced degree preferred.
● SHRM certification a plus
● 6-8 years of experience working in a management-level role in human resources
● In-depth knowledge of human resources and organizational behavior processes and best practices
● Ability to use and manage Google Suites
● Strong ability in using MS Office (MS Excel and MS Powerpoint, in particular)
● Experience with HR databases and HRIS systems
● Outstanding communication and interpersonal skills
● Ability to handle data with confidentiality
● Good organizational and time management skills
● Experience managing human resources programs in a variety of industries, including agriculture and manufacturing
● Authenticity – we care about the people with whom we work and the communities in which we live. We believe that clear communication builds a better world than suspicion, and that transparency is the key to building trust and confidence in all that we do.
● Resourcefulness – we seek individuals that are adaptive and creative, finding joy in connecting assets and ideas in novel ways that are not immediately apparent to others.
● Innovation – we seek individuals that are excited to not only work in a new industry, but to create one.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

● Maintain records of personnel-related data (payroll, personal information, leaves, turnover rates etc.) to ensure all employment requirements are met
● Administer payroll and benefits for all Grupo Flor employees
● Coordinate human resources trainings, programs and seminars for all Grupo Flor employees
● Ensure that safety-related programs and processes are in place
● Support the recruitment/hiring process by sourcing candidates, performing background checks, assisting in shortlisting, issuing employment contracts etc.
● Facilitate culture-building and human resources capital development
● Oversee general office administration for two administrative offices
● Coordinate with other departments to ensure administrative efficiency

COMPENSATION

● Very competitive salary and commission structure
● Health insurance
● Unlimited sick and vacation days
● Opportunity to work with an exciting, quickly-growing start-up in an emerging industry

ABOUT GRUPO FLOR

Grupo Flor is an ecosystem of cannabis companies based in Salinas, California that supports the entire supply chain of cannabis production, from real estate leasing and equipment financing to sound product manufacturing and retail operations. Grupo Flor seeks to elevate and legitimize the cannabis industry by pioneering a new business ecosystem of global companies and brands, and works to build leading cannabis companies that shape the future of the industry. For more information, visit our website here.

Grupo Flor is committed to creating a diverse environment and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. Furthermore, Grupo Flor is passionate about our local community and economy, and building an exciting future for both. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, genetics, disability, age, or veteran status. Diverse applicants are encouraged to apply.

To apply, send resumes and all relevant information to hr@grupoflor.com