Grupo Flor is driving innovation and building a top selling brand!

Driving Innovation

We’ve taken methods from the old-world tobacco trade and given it new life with our 1950’s Cigarillo Roller from the Dominican Republic, typically used for rolling cigars. After nearly a year of design and retrofits, this classic machinery is now ready to create our pre-rolls and blunts. This process is nothing short of an art form as our technicians feed paper into the chamber while the machine precisely measures the flower. This technique combines manual operation with innovative technology that monitors the amount of pressure on the flower to protect the product’s integrity. Under the careful eye of expert technicians, the Cigarillo Rolling Machine can produce 1,000 units within an hour, creating the perfect pre-roll or blunt.

“We are continually looking at ways to innovate and the Cigarillo Rolling Machine is an opportunity to transform technology to create efficiency in our production process while maintaining precision and personalized attention to the flower,” said Paul Henderson, CEO of Grupo Flor.


Welcoming White Fire to the Family

Grupo Flor has signed an LOI to acquire White Fire Dispensary located in San Jose. In three in years of operation, White Fire has become a leading San Jose dispensary in both revenue and customer service. White Fire also operates a successful delivery service in the San Jose area. 

“I’m extremely impressed with White Fire’s efficient operations and ability to alleviate wait times with its unique express lane pickup for those who want order ahead. This acquisition gives us key licenses in the Bay Area and access to seasoned retail talent,” said Paul Henderson, CEO of Grupo Flor.


Fun Fact: Smoke Stacks is California’s Top Seller!

Grupo’s own Smoke Stacks™ flower brand has been flying off the shelves in dispensaries across California. We are humbled to announce that in 2018 Smoke Stacks™ was the 5th best-selling flower brand and ranks as the #1 selling greenhouse flower in the state of California!

Our Smoke Stacks™ brand sources clean cannabis from Grupo Flor’s family of independent cultivators throughout Monterey County.

Source: BDS Analytics


East of Eden Updates

Big News – To better serve our customers, East of Eden is now open 7 days a week from 8am-10pm. We will soon be accepting credit cards and ATMs for in-store purchases!

Thanks For Stopping In – Our most recent Customer Appreciation Day served over 1,500 customers with amazing deals from our suppliers.

See What The Buzz is About – We now carry 80 strains of flower and 70 concentrates from all the top selling CA brands.


Washington moves closer to delivering protections for banks serving the cannabis industry

There is a 75% chance of “banking clarity” for cannabis companies in the current session of Congress, said Isaac Boltansky, director of policy research for Compass Point Research and Trading, in a recent note.

Other experts say the chances for an actual cannabis-banking law are below that level, but we remain optimistic that Congress will do the right thing.

2019 Could be the Biggest Year for Marijuana Reform Yet

One of the biggest reasons for encouragement is a bill that many cannabis advocates believe could end up on President Trump’s desk: the States Act, which would formally leave marijuana regulation to the states instead of the federal government.
That single piece of legislation – while far short of what many MJ activists want – would be a “quantum leap” forward, in the words of Cannabis Trade Federation CEO Neal Levine.
Perhaps the foremost factor that could prove the dealmaker for marijuana reform in 2019 is the change in congressional makeup.
“A lot of the things that were stopping us in the past were chairmen in positions of power that just refused to engage at all,” said U.S. Rep. David Joyce, a Republican from Ohio.
“This is the first Congress in history where, going into it, it seems that broad marijuana reforms are actually achievable,” said Tom Angell, an advocate-journalist who runs Marijuana Moment.
Members of Congress are lining up to introduce bills that never got to see the light of day when Republicans ran the show. Two bills have already been filed: a reintroduction of the CARERS Act by Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) and Don Young (R-Alaska), which would expand marijuana research, allow VA doctors to discuss pot with veteran patients and prevent the federal government from meddling with state-legal programs without removing marijuana from the schedules created by the Controlled Substances Act of 1970; and H.R. 420, the “Regulate Marijuana like Alcohol Act” by Blumenauer, which would remove marijuana from the list of most dangerous drugs, “de-scheduling it” in Congress-speak, and shift regulatory authority to the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms.
“For the past several Congresses, there have been dozens of pieces of marijuana legislation filed, but this is the first time where advocates can legitimately say that some of these bills can actually pass,” Angell told me.
And, sure, Republicans remain in control of the Senate, so it seems unlikely that such bills would have much luck there. But the current Senate is practically the same body that just a month ago passed a criminal justice reform bill 87 to 12, and under the leadership of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell voted to legalize hemp — the non-psychoactive sister plant of marijuana — through the Farm Bill.
This level of disconnection between state and federal law cannot hold for much longer, and it might not have to. In the wake of the Farm Bill, the idea that Congress could remove marijuana from the list of scheduled drugs is now conceivable. After all, the plant is now legal; only the potency is in question. Maybe this year, for the first time, Blumenauer’s bill doesn’t seem so crazy. Nothing would solidify 2019 as marijuana’s biggest year yet more than a rollback of that half-century-old designation.
“It would not be shocking to see the end of federal marijuana prohibition signed into law this year,” Angell told me. “This is the first time that actually seems achievable.”
Source: Politico Magazine, James Higdon

Office Manager

Office Manager
Grupo Flor Office Managers are diversely intelligent and authentic individuals who are excited by the opportunity to shape the future of the cannabis market from within the administration of the organization. As a member of this team, you’ll demonstrate your advanced knowledge of professional office management with a goal to maintain a pleasant work environment, ensuring high levels of organizational effectiveness, accuracy, and professional communication. This dynamic and developing market presents daily challenges, all of which will require your resourcefulness and innovation to efficiently resolve.  Whether the administrative task requires great attention to detail, organization or dedication to meet deadlines, you enjoy working collaboratively to support and manage several offices in a cost and time efficient manner.

 

As an Office Manager, you will primarily be responsible for a range of administrative and office support activities to facilitate the efficient operation of the organization. You will play a key role as the office hero, seamlessly transitioning between to-do lists to complex event planning, proactively solving problems and bringing a personable, positive attitude to the workplace.

 

Grupo Flor seeks to elevate and legitimize the cannabis industry by pioneering a new business ecosystem of global companies and brands and works to build leading cannabis companies that shape the future of the industry. Grupo Flor Office Managers are office heroes to the business and work directly with and within all departments, making the administrative department an integral piece of Grupo Flor’s success.


Office Manager Responsibilities
Demonstrate proficiency in advanced office duties, including answering phones, mail, maintaining inventory records, ordering office supplies and managing day-to-day operations
Manage and maintain electronic and paper filing systems
Manage and maintain inventory of office supplies for 2-3 different offices
Oversee general office budget with the executive and accounting team
Warmly greet and provide general support to clients, vendors, employees and visitors
Coordinate and facilitate in-house or off-site activities including company parties, celebrations, conferences and meetings on time and within budget
Design and distribute general company communications on a variety of channels including Slack, Gmail, DocuSign and more
Demonstrate professional and effective written and verbal communication skills
Compile and prepare presentations and reports in conjunction with department leads
Onboard new vendors, obtain credit terms and ensure the collection of W9s
Assist accounting with basic bookkeeping tasks
Promptly and appropriately respond to items with high sense of urgency
Other duties as assigned


Required Skills
Demonstrate proficiency in Google Suites and MS Office Suite, including Excel
Demonstrate proficiency in advanced office administration
Demonstrate professional and effective written and verbal communication skills
Effectively prioritize between shifting tasks while maintaining attention to detail
Demonstrate professional work ethic and reliable attendance

 

Desired Skills
Bilingual in English and Spanish is a plus
Experience in cash handling is a plus
Enthusiasm for and experience with Cannabis a plus
Familiarity with Adobe Creative Suite or other graphic design software a plus
Authenticity – we care about the people with whom we work and the communities in which we live. We believe that clear communication builds a better world than suspicion, and that transparency is the key to building trust and confidence in all that we do.
Resourcefulness – we seek individuals that are adaptive and creative, finding joy in connecting assets and ideas in novel ways that are not immediately apparent to others.
Innovation – we seek individuals that are excited to not only work in a new industry, but to create one.

 

Compensation
Very competitive salary structure
Health insurance
Unlimited sick and vacation days
Opportunity to work with an exciting, quickly-growing start-up in an emerging industry

 

ABOUT GRUPO FLOR
Grupo Flor is an ecosystem of cannabis companies based in Salinas, California that supports the entire supply chain of cannabis production, from real estate leasing and equipment financing to sound product manufacturing and retail operations. Grupo Flor seeks to elevate and legitimize the cannabis industry by pioneering a new business ecosystem of global companies and brands, and works to build leading cannabis companies that shape the future of the industry.
Grupo Flor is committed to creating a diverse environment and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. Furthermore, Grupo Flor is passionate about our local community and economy, and building an exciting future for both. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, genetics, disability, age, or veteran status. Diverse applicants are encouraged to apply.

Colombia Turns A New Leaf

Colombia has rightly attracted the attention of international cannabis investors, but the country faces unique political and social challenges

Guest Feature: Mat Youkee is a consultant and journalist covering Latin America from his base in Bogotá, Colombia. Since May 2018 he has published The Colombia Cannabis Investor, a free monthly business intelligence publication focused on the Colombian medical marijuana industry. He tweets at @colcannin

Birds of Passage, Colombia’s nomination for this year’s Oscars, tells the story of tribal conflict for control of marijuana drug routes in the country’s northern regions in the 1970s. The story is a timely and tragic reminder that, before Colombia became synonymous with cocaine, it was a hub for high-quality grass for American counterculture.

Today Colombia is in a different place. Over a decade of strong economic growth was capped, in 2016, with a peace treaty with the FARC, the largest guerrilla army. But the fertile soils and ample sunlight still make a great place for growers. Today, a rapidly developing regulatory framework is allowing local and foreign firms to build a legal medical marijuana industry.

In the last five months, Canadian majors including Canopy Growth Corp, Aphria and Aurora have acquired projects in the South American nation. Local companies PharmaCielo and Khiron Life Sciences also have advanced-stage cultivation and production projects, the latter becoming the first Colombian cannabis firm to list on the Toronto Venture Exchange. The big players have pledged more than $200m in foreign investment for the coming year and a host of enterprising domestic entrepreneurs are acquiring plots and applying for licenses, with nearly 200 awarded or under process.

There are strong grounds for this optimism. In January 2018 the International Narcotics Control Board, the UN body that regulates the global cultivation of medicinal narcotics, allotted Colombia 40.5 tonnes of marijuana production. This was the largest allocation of any country, representing 44% of the global total, and outstripping the US and Israel.

Aside from its climatic advantages, Colombia has a strong tradition of cultivation of flowers, cheap labor costs and a regulatory regime that allows for the export of medicinal marijuana products. Commercialization of the cannabis flower is not permitted, ensuring that all legally grown plants must be converted into an oil, cream or other medicinal product. The Colombian healthcare sector – indebted to the tune of $4bn – is desperately looking to cut its expenses, and research from Khiron suggests that over 5 million locals could benefit from medicinal marijuana products, helping to cut imports of opiates.

Colombia is no stranger to Canadian capital markets. Especially since the early 2000s, Canadian geologists have been scouring the previously out-of-bounds regions for oil and mineral deposits and Bay Street investors have seen a number of Colombian success stories. Many firms’ successes were based on their ability to successfully manage political and security risks that had been overestimated by mainstream investors. Now that Colombia is in vogue, the concern is that investors underestimate residual risk.

Those risks can be broadly categorized into three groups, with the first being regulatory confusion. Although the previous government made a clear move in 2016 to build a medicinal marijuana market, with Congress approving the law by a huge majority, many of the downstream regulatory changes have yet to be solidified. Marijuana is yet to be classified as a medicinal plant by the food and drug standards agency. The system to award production quotas remains opaque and local banks have steered well clear of opening bank accounts for cannabis companies, let alone providing loans.

The more dynamic local firms, such as Khiron and PharmaCielo have invested significantly in navigating the regulatory maze and educating government and medical personnel on cannabis issues. However, newly elected conservative president Ivan Duque chose a crackdown on micro-trafficking of marijuana as his first social policy. While no one expects him to reverse legalized medicinal use, it raises questions as to the political will to put in place the necessary reforms to boost the industry.

The second area of risk is local growing conditions. While Colombia has dozens of local cannabis strains, many firms have opted to bring foreign seeds to the market. But certain areas around Bogotá and Medellín, the two largest cities, have been affected by an intensive flower industry. Some foreign strains have proved less resistant to local soils and pests.

Another significant issue is physical security and community relations in rural Colombia. In recent years populations near major mining and oil projects have used local referendums to put a halt to extractive projects. One local firm has faced stiff community opposition at its project in the department (state) of Santander due to the perceived effect its project will have on local water sources.  Finally, the murder of three geologists working for a Canadian mining firm in September is a reminder that, despite the peace deal, rural Colombia has serious security threats in certain localized areas.

Colombia has rightly gained a reputation as one of the most exciting cannabis markets in Latin America and the industry has the potential to become a major plank of the national economy. But investors should be under no illusion of the challenges companies face. As well as strong technical teams and a vigilant security protocol, firms will need to keep a close eye on the morphing regulatory and political framework. Colombia Cannabis Investor, a free monthly newsletter, aims to report the most timely business intelligence on the sector, straight from Bogotá and Medellín.

September State Legislative Look

On August 31st, the Legislature adjourned for the 2017-18 legislative session.  Of the hot end-of-session bills, like wildfire liability and net neutrality, some cannabis bills were still being debated on the Floor. Of the many cannabis-related bills, three have already been signed and one vetoed by the Governor.  Twenty-three never made it fully through the legislative process, and these are the 13 bills pending Governor action before the September 30th deadline:

AB 1793 (Bonta) – This bill expedites the identification, review, and notification of individuals who may be eligible for recall or dismissal, dismissal and sealing, or redesignation of specified cannabis-related convictions.

AB 1863 (Jones-Sawyer) – This bill allows taxpayers subject to Personal Income Tax Law to deduct ordinary and necessary business expenses attributable to commercial cannabis activity by a licensee.

AB 2020 (Quirk) – This bill would authorize the Bureau of Cannabis Control to issue a temporary state license to provide on-site sales and consumption of cannabis at a temporary event located at a fairground, district agricultural association event, or at another venue expressly approved by a local jurisdiction.

AB 2255 (Lackey) – Would allow law enforcement to seize and potentially destroy cannabis, in consultation with the Bureau of Cannabis Control (BCC), if a licensed distributor is found to be transporting cannabis or cannabis product that is significantly in excess of the amount stated on the shipping manifest.  Clarifies that transportation of cannabis or cannabis product with a counterfeit shipping manifest is unlawful.

AB 2799 (Jones-Sawyer) – Requires an applicant for a state license under the Medicinal and Adult Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) to provide a statement that the applicant employs, or will employ within one year of receiving a license, an employee who has successfully completed a training course offered by a training provider authorized by an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Training Institute Education Center.  Exempts applicants with only one employee.

AB 2899 (Rubio) – Prohibits a cannabis licensee from publishing or disseminating advertising or marketing while the licensee’s license is suspended.

AB 2914 (Cooley) – Prohibits an alcoholic beverage licensee from selling, offering, or providing cannabis or cannabis products, including the sale of an alcoholic beverage that contains cannabis, and clarifies existing law banning alcoholic beverages containing tetrahydrocannabinol or cannabinoids, regardless of source.

AB 2980 (Gipson) – Redefines “premises” for purposes of licensed cannabis businesses to allow for the sharing of common use areas, such as bathrooms, break rooms, locker rooms, hallways, or loading docks wherein no license privileges are exercised.

SB 311 (Pan) – This bill authorizes a distributor to transport cannabis and cannabis products to another distributor.

SB 829 (Wiener) – This bill allows specified cannabis license holders to donate medicinal cannabis and medicinal cannabis products to qualified patients, and allows such donations to be exempt from the cultivation tax, the use tax, and the excise tax.

SB 1294 (Bradford) – This bill establishes the California Cannabis Equity Act of 2018, which will allow, upon appropriations by the Legislature, a local jurisdiction to submit an application to the Bureau of Cannabis Control (Bureau) for a grant to assist local equity applicants and local equity licensees through that local jurisdiction’s equity program; requires the Bureau to post model ordinances; and requires the Bureau to publish a report on local jurisdiction equity programs, as specified.

SB 1409 (Wilk) – This bill updates existing California law pertaining to the production and cultivation of industrial hemp.

SB 1459 (Cannella) – This bill establishes a provisional cannabis license that may be issued at the sole discretion of a licensing authority, as specified, until January 1, 2020.

 

Post-Processing Trimmer

JOB DESCRIPTION

Grupo Flor is looking to hire Post-Processing Trimmers responsible for all parts of the trimming process.  Specifically, this position will be responsible for:

  • Flower trimming
  • Product weighing
  • Product packaging
  • Product storage
  • Quality assurance
  • Other duties as assigned

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Able to follow trimming instructions and direction
  • Punctuality
  • Ability to work in teams
  • Focus and thoroughness
  • Authenticity – we care about the people with whom we work and the communities in which we live. We believe that clear communication builds a better world than suspicion, and that transparency is the key to building trust and confidence in all that we do.
  • Resourcefulness – we seek individuals that are adaptive and creative, finding joy in connecting assets and ideas in novel ways that are not immediately apparent to others.
  • Innovation – we seek individuals that are excited to not only work in a new industry, but to create one.

ABOUT GRUPO FLOR

Grupo Flor is an ecosystem of cannabis companies based in Salinas, California that supports the entire supply chain of cannabis production, from real estate leasing and equipment financing to sound product manufacturing and retail operations.  Grupo Flor seeks to elevate and legitimize the cannabis industry by pioneering a new business ecosystem of global companies and brands, and works to build leading cannabis companies that shape the future of the industry.  For more information, visit our website here.

Grupo Flor is committed to creating a diverse environment and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.  Furthermore, Grupo Flor is passionate about our local community and economy, and building an exciting future for both.  All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, genetics, disability, age, or veteran status.  Diverse applicants are encouraged to apply.

To apply, send resumes and all relevant information to hr@grupoflor.com

Smoke Stacks™ Leads the Way After Implementation of Harsh Regulations

California’s cannabis testing regulations became effective July 1, 2018, increasing the cannabis test thresholds to levels never before experienced in the California market. Most California producers believed the state would, yet again, extend the regulatory implementation period another six months. Grupo Flor however, took a contrary view. We organized our processes and lab partner relationships so that our in-house flower and concentrates brand, Smoke Stacks™,  would hit shelves July 1, 2018 being fully tested, labeled and packaged in full compliance with the law.

The July 1, 2018 implementation impact was massive and sudden. Whole swaths of California wholesale supply chain producers were unable to meet the new test standards and Facebook and Instagram posts went viral of empty dispensary shelves across the state. One winner emerged: Smoke Stacks™.

While certainly exciting in terms of validating and testing our products and business processes, the most thrilling aspects has been relationship development and the acquisition of market share. The cherry on top is the great response to the quality of our product from shops throughout the state.

While betting on July’s implementation and preparing to mobilize may not seem genius, consider that Grupo Flor’s distribution company had to source goods from a small and diverse archipelago of farms that were themselves producing compliant cannabis.

Quite a feat in the absence of a robust and standard supply chain.

Local Look

A New Beginning
Jennifer Rosenthal Iverson, Esq.

Jennifer is a local cannabis and criminal defense attorney and Vice President of MCCIA. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and does not reflect an official position of the Association.

July 1 marked the beginning of new and exciting times at both the State and local levels.  The most impactful regulations facing operators are the testing and packaging requirements.  These requirements have had a substantial effect on the market. Across the state dispensaries and retail facilities are experiencing the fallout of the supply chain.

The County of Monterey is gearing up on enforcement for all cannabis operators.  As indicated in the County’s recent memorandum released June 29th, in order to remain in good standing you must submit your conditional use permit application by August 1, 2018.  If you do not submit your conditional use permit application you will not be able to continue cultivating on site.  Further, the County is conducting both canopy audits and inspections for building code violations. Any building code violations found on site could have a substantial negative impact on the operator’s ability to continue cultivating and moving forward through the regulatory scheme.  If you are conducting structural improvements to buildings and greenhouses it is critical to go through the required permitting process.

In addition, the County and State will be issuing enforcement actions against all entities that are currently operating with over 25 employees and do not have a permitted public water system. If you are operating with more than 25 employees it is critical to start the process of the State Public Water System application.  The process alone can take up to 6 months and your conditional use permit application will not be deemed completed until you have submitted your application.

First Look at California’s Proposed Final Marijuana Regs

California regulators released the first draft of permanent adult-use and medical marijuana regulations on Friday, July 13, starting the clock on a process of hearings and public comment that will end later this year with a final set of rules governing the nascent industry.

The proposed rules are contained in 315 pages of documents issued by the Bureau of Cannabis Control, the Department of Food and Agriculture and the Department of Public Health.

The changes that were most apparent were:

  • Deliveries anywhere. The new language will allow licensed marijuana deliveries in any city or county in the state, even those that ban retail outlets, processing and cultivation. The provisions are similar to legislation, now shelved, that would have barred local governments from stopping state-regulated companies from delivering to their residents. That bill drew opposition from cities and counties, which argued that local control is a key tenet of Proposition 64, the 2016 voter initiative legalizing recreational marijuana. Companies including WeDrop Cannabis Delivery, CannaWagon and Weedmaps lobbied for the bill.
  • Advertising restrictions are increased New rules expand restrictions on marijuana advertising that might appeal to children, such as the use of inflatables, toys and cartoon characters. Additionally, outdoor advertising must be affixed to a building or a “permanent structure.” That would appear to bar roving billboards attached to trucks or truck trailers. As for billboards, “It would depend on the billboard,” said Bureau of Cannabis Control spokesman Alex Traverso. “We’d have to look it at case-by-case.” The bureau’s proposal also offers guidance for how advertisers can show that 71.6 percent of their audience is 21 years of age or older.
  • Attention events-holders. Changes will require cannabis event-holders to provide more details about where licensed retailers will be set up, where attendees can light up or consume marijuana and where sales will occur. Cannabis-focused events have proven challenging for organizers working under the state’s emergency regulations. Organizers of the Chalice Festival sued the Bureau of Cannabis Control and the city of Victorville in June after they declined to issue permits for the event planned for the San Bernardino County fairgrounds this month.

View the proposed text of regulations by clicking here.

Distributing the highest quality cannabis throughout California

Regulatory compliance and accountability is the “What” we do; but it’s really the “Why” we do and “How” we do distribution that sets FlorX apart. FlorX is the distribution arm of Grupo Flor and its run by cannabis retail veterans, supply chain logistics experts and straight-up process nerds who combined efforts create a killer distribution service with one singular goal: reduce back-end hassles so shop owners can focus on the front of shop.

“FlorX is paving the way with cannabis distribution by embracing forward looking supply chain strategies. The team at FlorX is obsessed with procuring quality product and delivering world class customer service.  The team at FlorX is also very focused on compliance to local and state regulations. This has allowed FlorX to be there for dispensaries when others were not prepared, said Steve Podell, President of Distribution.